Brilliant writing, Extraordinary performance – but too heavy for audience

Reviews 1-Feb-2013 4:38 PM IST Top 10 Cinema Comments

The trailer and tagline – 2 Lives, One Name was more than enough to keep us all on a wait for its release. David on the release cards with Manirathnam’s Kadal indeed generated huge waves of sensation that the makers are sure as shooting stars with its quality content. Obviously, David boasts on lots of exceptional qualities on both narrative and technical front. The sleek cuts on edit, visual fiesta on cinematography, top-notch background and what else – a gripping narration and extraordinary performance by the actors keeps you engaged throughout the show.

Before looking down to the review of this film, you’ll have to be clear about certain things. Bejoy Nambiar doesn’t go for a copy of his mentor Manirathnam’s ‘Aayutha Ezhuthu’ or it’s inspired international movies like ‘Amores Perros, ’21 Grams’, et al that had multiple stories in parallel tracks coalescing at a single point. This is completely a newfangled narration and of course a quite commendable as well.

The film is set in two different backdrops of year and place

Year: 1999
Place: Mumbai

David (Jiiva) is a happy-go-lucky youngster hailing from a pious Christian family. Aspiring to become a world famous guitarist, he keeps trying out on his best to scale greater heights. But his life takes a turn when his family is pulled into a problem created by politicians.

Year: 2010
Place: Goa

David (Vikram) finds himself boozed up round the clock and keeps his moments occupied with his own emotions. A fisherman by profession, he has close acquaintance with a girl (Tabu), who runs a parlour. A turn in his life occurs, when he finds himself closer to a beautiful girl Roma (Isha Sharwani), who is getting engaged to his friend Peter for marriage.

These David have their own conflicts to face now and a decision they make will change their lives forever.

What’s the first thing that draws you into this film? Obviously, it’s the outstanding performance of Chiyaan Vikram and Jiiva. Moreover, it is worth mentioning that after a long time, we tend to witness Vikram in a captivating role since ‘Anniyan’. Well, he doesn’t perform anything as challenging as Ambi, Anniyan or Remo, but shows up with the same energy that was prevailing before a decade. Thanks to Bejoy Nambiar for a good portrayal of Vikram. His emotional dilemma between friendship and love and his chill-pill mannerisms are appealing. Jiiva sleepwalks through the role of David, a young energetic boy. He is so much electrified in the emotional scenes, where he takes on the politicians is extraordinary.

Bejoy Nambiar has done a fabulous job on narration of the film with his excellent writing. It’s not an easy task to come up with a plot of parallel stories without conjoining them. But he excels completely to the core. The other highlighting trait about the film is the sharp characterizations that are so unique laced with humour and realism. Check out for Vikram’s ghost dad getting into anyone’s body only to communicate with his son. There are certain things that may go beyond the perception of few groups of audiences. Say for instance, sister and her younger brother smoking together isn’t accepted anywhere in the society here. Lara Dutta does her part well and Tabu on pars scores brownie points with her performance. Nasser is brilliant in the role of pastor spreading the good news of God and helping the needy and poor. Isha Sharwani is the showstopper here as her acting skills in the role of a deaf-n-dumb is prodigious

As mentioned earlier, the technical aspects of this film keeps us so much captivated. The different tones of cinematography make it more appealing.

On the whole, David is exceedingly exceptional when it comes to Indian film industry and deserves special mention for a new dimensional screenplay. However, when it comes to the context of business, it completely banks on the perception level of universal audiences on this film.

Verdict: Brilliant writing, Extraordinary performance – but too heavy for audience

Review by Richard Mahesh

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